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Copyright

This guide provides copyright information and links, but not legal opinion, which are relevant to the University community

Theses and Copyright

University of Canberra Higher Degree by Research Students hold copyright over their thesis (though under the University's higher degree rules the University retains some rights to copy and distribute copies of University theses)

It is University policy that UC Higher Degree by Research theses are made available online, in full text, via the UC Research Portal.

When giving permission to reproduce your thesis online you assert that you “have obtained all the appropriate copyright permissions for all copyrighted materials used in my thesis”

Many theses include material such as long quotes, images, tables, maps, diagrams etc. created by other people.  This is called 3rd party material and is usually covered by copyright. This guide will assist you to ensure you have all required permissions to reproduce this material in your thesis.

When Do I NOT Need Copyright Permission?

You do not need to request permission to use 3rd party copyright material in your thesis when:

  • You own the copyright
  • Copyright has expired
  • You are using an “insubstantial portion” (this refers to the significance as well as the quantity of the material you wish to use)
  • It comes under another Fair Dealing exception, e.g. criticism or review (ensure you understand the exception and adhere to the rules and limits)
  • You, or the item, have an express licence to reuse the work - ensure you adhere to the terms of reuse

Reproducing Your Published Article In Your Thesis

You do not need permission from the publisher to reproduce your  published article in your thesis if -

  • You retained copyright of the work and have not signed over exclusive publication rights to the publisher

  • Your work is published under a Creative Commons License

You also may not need to request permission to reuse your published article in your thesis if the publisher already has a policy covering this reuse. See the list of publisher policies for reuse of published articles in theses here.

Note: this list was last updated 15/7/20 and is intended as a guide. Please check the publisher's website or your publishing agreement for confirmation.

Article Version Definitions:

  • Pre-print - This is the author's manuscript version of an academic article or other publication that is submitted to the publisher. This version and is not peer reviewed or altered by the publisher in any way.
  • Author’s accepted manuscript (AAM) - This is the author's final version of an academic article or other publication. It has been peer-reviewed and revised into its final form by the author. An AAM can also be called the accepted manuscript, post-print or an accepted version. AAMs are not altered by the publishers in any way. They may be a Word document or PDF. Publisher proof versions are NOT the same as an AAM.
  • Published Version - The published version may also be referred to as the Version of Record (VOR). It is the final typeset and edited version of the research item that has been made available by the publisher in the publication or website etc.  

 

The CSIRO Policy does not specifically mention use of articles in thesis, but their general policy on published article reproduction in an institutional Repository are:

Version allowed

Accepted Author Manuscript

Embargo period

No

Conditions

 

 

- Link to the published version on the CSIRO Publishing website

-  The institutional repository should be that of the institution employing the author at the time the work was conducted

Link:

https://www.publish.csiro.au/journals/forauthors

    

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.

Version permitted

Published version

Embargo period

No

Conditions

Link to the publisher’s website using the DOI

Link:

https://www.elsevier.com/about/policies/sharing#publishedarticle

    

You can include your article or book chapter in your dissertation or thesis. 

Note the restricted use of the published version; UC theses are made available online

Version(s) permitted

Pre-print, author’s accepted manuscript, published version

Embargo period

No

Conditions

If the thesis will be available online do not use the published version

Link:

https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/services/authors/author-policies/author-rights

    

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.          

Version(s) permitted

Author’s accepted manuscript

Embargo period

No

Conditions

Text excerpts: Provide the full citation of the original published article followed by the IEEE copyright line: © 20XX IEEE. If you are reusing a substantial portion of your article and you are not the senior author, obtain the senior author’s approval before reusing the text.

Graphics and tables: The IEEE copyright line (© 20XX IEEE) should appear with each reprinted graphic and table.

Full text article: Include the following copyright notice in the references: “© 20XX IEEE. Reprinted, with permission, from [full citation of original published article].”

Link:

http://ieeeauthorcenter.ieee.org/choose-a-publishing-agreement/avoid-infringement-upon-ieee-copyright/

When posting your thesis on your university website, include the following message:

“In reference to IEEE copyrighted material which is used with permission in this thesis, the IEEE does not endorse any of [name of university or educational entity]’s products or services. Internal or personal use of this material is permitted. If interested in reprinting/republishing IEEE copyrighted material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution, please go to http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/rights_link.html to learn how to obtain a License from RightsLink. If applicable, University Microfilms and/or ProQuest Library, or the Archives of Canada may supply single copies of the dissertation.”         

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.

           

Version(s) permitted

Published version

Embargo period

No

Conditions

Authors must properly cite the published article in their thesis according to current citation standards.

Material from: 'AUTHOR, TITLE, JOURNAL TITLE, published [YEAR], [publisher - as it appears on our copyright page]'

Link:

https://www.nature.com/nature-research/reprints-and-permissions/permissions-requests

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.           

Version(s) permitted

Not stated. Generally, they allow reuse of the Author’s Accepted Manuscript, so suggest that version may be the best to use

Embargo period

No

Conditions

Thesis not to be published commercially

Ensure that a full acknowledgment is made to the original source of the material including the journal name, volume, issue, page numbers, year of publication, title of article and to Oxford University Press and/or the learned society

Link:

You may reproduce your article in your thesis, but you do need to request permission to use the published version permission if it will be available via the UC Research Portal.

There are several general conditions listed also. Contact the Library if you required clarification

           

Version(s) permitted

Original Submission or Accepted Manuscript or                     Published version

Embargo period

Not mentioned

Conditions

Access to the Original Submission and Accepted Manuscript (in your thesis) is (to be) provided at no charge

Any re-use terms for users of websites and repositories (where your Original Submission or Accepted Manuscript are posted) are restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses

You may not post the Final Published PDF on any unrestricted website or repository without permission from SAGE

You may not republish or translate any version of your Contribution in another journal without prior permission from SAGE

The journal as the original publication of your Contribution is appropriately credited by including the full citation information each time your Contribution, or excerpts, are further distributed or re-used:

After your Contribution has been accepted for publication and until it is assigned a DOI, please include a statement that your Contribution has been accepted for publication in the journal.

Once full citation information for your Contribution is available, please include this with your posted Contribution, in a format similar to the following:


Author(s), Contribution Title, Journal Title (Journal Volume Number and Issue Number) pp. xx-xx. Copyright © [year] (Copyright Holder). DOI: [DOI number].

Link:

SAGE:  Author Archiving and Re-Use Guidelines

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.

           

Version(s) permitted

Final Published Version

Embargo period

No

Conditions

Authors must properly cite the published article in their thesis according to current citation standards.

Material from: 'AUTHOR, TITLE, JOURNAL TITLE, published [YEAR], [publisher - as it appears on our copyright page]'

Link:

Springer Rights, Permissions & Licensing

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.         

Version(s) permitted

article Author’s Original Manuscript (AOM) or Accepted Manuscript(AM)

 

Embargo period

Yes – check journal embargo period

Conditions

Include the citation: “This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Africa Review  on 17/04/2014, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/12345678.1234.123456

Link:

Taylor & Francis: Copyright & You  

You may reproduce your article in your thesis without requesting permission.

           

Version(s) permitted

Author Accepted Manuscript

Embargo period

Yes – as per the journal embargo period

Use their Author Compliance Tool to check the embargo period for individual journals

Conditions

After the embargo has passed the Accepted Version may be made public on these sites (includes Institutional Research Repository).

The article must include a note and DOI link on the first page (see the self-archiving policy for more details) and must not be made to look like the final version of record.

The version posted must include the following notice on the first page:

"This is the (pre-/) peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions."

Link:

Wiley: Self Archiving Policy  

Getting Permission to Use Other People's Work

  •  Identify the copyright owner - remember the creator of the work may not be the copyright owner. See the Australian Copyright Council information sheet: Permission: How to get it for information on ways to locate a copyright owner
  • Always place your request in writing; an email, letter or online permissions form
  • Include a full description of the material you wish to use
  • State clearly that the material will be included in your thesis which will be made available, in full text, in the university's online (non-commercial) institutional repository
  • Retain copies of all permissions 

The copyright owner of the work has every right to refuse permission, or charge a fee for the material's reuse

The Fair Dealing for "Research or Study" exception doesn't cover your theses when...

Once your work is distributed for public use you are no longer covered by the “Fair Dealing for Research or Study” copyright exception.

Making a thesis available for public use (as a hardbound book on a library shelf or) in full text electronically via the University Research Portal is considered, in copyright terms, distributing or publishing the work.

You will require permission from copyright owners once you include a “substantial part” of a copyrighted work in your thesis. It is the thesis author's responsibility to gain these permissions.

 

Open Resources

Using open resources will reduce the amount of permissions you will need to request. A wide variety of images, maps, graphs etc. can be found in open resources websites and open academic publications.

Don't forget the moral rights of authors of open resources; open content must still be attributed.

Creative Commons Australia information on attribution of Creative Commons licensed material

This Attribution Builder for open resources will help you create an attribution for Creative Commons material.