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UC Referencing Guide

What is AGLC Style?

The Australian Guide to Legal Citation 4th edition (AGLC4) is produced by the Melbourne University Law Review Association and is the standard guide to referencing for legal writing by students, academics and legal practitioners.  AGLC outlines rules for citing local and international legal material as well as non-legal material.

AGLC4 is a footnote referencing style.

General Guidelines

  • Authors - Give authors as they appear in the source.  Do not include full stops after initials

Andrew J Williams

P R Trent

  • Titles - are usually written in italics.  Capitalise the first letter of all significant words.

This is My Life: Collection of Photos by Andrew Snowden

  • Titles - of chapters, articles, submissions or segments are entered in single quotation marks.

'Leadership for Change'

  • Journal titles - are written in full, in italics.  Capitalise the first letter of all significant words.

Psychology Today and Tomorrow

  • Publishers - are written in the briefest form to identify the publisher.  If the author and publisher are the same then the publisher is omitted.

Kluwer Academic   not   Kluwer Academic Press

Wiley   not   Wiley and Sons

  • Dates - are written in the form Day Month Year.

23 September 2010

  • Pinpoints - are the specific sections of the source that you are quoting.  These can be pages, paragraphs, sections, time in recording, etc.  Pages are written as the page numbers e.g. 53–4, 87–93. Paragraphs and sections are entered in square brackets e.g. [15] [21]–[24]. The time in a recording is entered as Hour:Minute:Second.  The dash between these numbers is an en-dash.

In-Text Citations

You need to provide an in-text reference if you:

  • use a long direct quotation
  • use a short direct quotation
  • use an indirect quotation by either paraphrasing or summarising.

AGLC uses Arabic numbers to number references. The numbers are put in superscript e.g.1

Bibliography

If a Bibliography is required it should list all sources that were read, not only those referred to in the text.

The Bibliography may be broken down into sections:

A Articles / Books / Reports
B Cases
C Legislation
D Treaties
E Other

Within each section references are sorted alphabetically by author, or title if no author is listed.

Bibliography entries are structured in the same way as Footnotes. However the first author's surname and first name/s are inverted, and there is no full stop at the end of the citation.

Trent, John Andrew and Peter Smith, The Complete Guide to Cat Care (Butterworth, 2001)

Footnotes

  • Footnotes must start with a number corresponding to the number in text.  This number is also superscript. e.g. 22
  • Footnotes are entered with a hanging indent.
  • Footnotes end with a full stop

 

22 J W Tester, ‘The Future of Geothermal Energy as a Major Global Energy Supplier’ (Paper presented at Sir Mark Oliphant International Frontiers of Science and Technology Australian Geothermal Energy Conference, Melbourne, 19–22 August 2008) <http://www.ga.gov.au/image_cache/GA11825.pdf>.

  • Repeated footnotes

            - use Ibid pinpoint when a footnote is repeated immediately
            - use Author (n footnote number) pinpoint when a footnote is repeated but not immediately below the original footnote
            - for cases and legislation, or items without an author, a short title my be used followed by (n footnote number) pinpoint.

 22 J W Tester, ‘The Future of Geothermal Energy as a Major Global Energy Supplier’ (Paper presented at Sir Mark Oliphant International Frontiers of Science and Technology Australian Geothermal Energy Conference, Melbourne, 19–22 August 2008) 18 <http://www.ga.gov.au/image_cache/GA11825.pdf>.

23 Ibid, 15.

24 Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (Qld) 16.

25 Tester, (n 22) 7.

AGLC4 and EndNote

The Library acknowledges University of Technology Sydney (UTS) Library for the following EndNote / AGLC4 guides